Uncertainty is where things happen

 

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We tend to imagine that the special skill of an entrepreneur lies in having a powerfully original idea and then fighting to turn that vision into reality…

…The most valuable skill of a successful entrepreneur … isn’t “vision” or “passion” or a steadfast insistence on destroying every barrier between yourself and some prize you’re obsessed with. Rather, it’s the ability to adopt an unconventional approach to learning: an improvisational flexibility not merely about which route to take towards some predetermined objective, but also a willingness to change the destination itself. This is a flexibility that might be squelched by rigid focus on any one goal…

…”Start with your means. Don’t wait for the perfect opportunity. Start taking action, based on what you have readily available: what you are, what you know and who you know.” A second is the “principle of affordable loss”: Don’t be guided by thoughts of how wonderful the rewards might be if you were spectacularly successful at any given next step. Instead – and there are distinct echoes, here, of the Stoic focus on the worst-case scenario – ask how big the loss would be if you failed. So long as it would be tolerable, that’s all you need to know. Take that next step, and see what happens…
…Uncertainty is where things happen. It is where the opportunities – for success, for happiness, for really living – are waiting.

 
The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking Paperback by Oliver Burkeman

A Simple Exercise to Increase Well-Being

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We think too much about what goes wrong and not enough about what goes right in our lives. Of course, sometimes it makes sense to analyze bad events so that we can learn from them and avoid them in the future. However, people tend to spend more time thinking about what is bad in life than is helpful. Worse, this focus on negative events sets us up for anxiety and depression. One way to keep this from happening is to get better at thinking about and savoring what went well.

For sound evolutionary reasons, most of us are not nearly as good at dwelling on good events as we are at analyzing bad events. Those of our ancestors who spent a lot of time basking in the sunshine of good events, when they should have been preparing for disaster, did not survive the Ice Age. So to overcome our brains’ natural catastrophic bent, we need to work on and practice this skill of thinking about what went well.

-Every night for the next week, set aside ten minutes before you go to sleep. 

-Write down three things that went well today and why they went well. 

-Next to each positive event, answer the question “Why did this happen?” Writing about why the positive events in your life happened may seem awkward at first, but please stick with it for one week.

(A Simple Exercise to Increase Well-Being and Lower Depression from Martin Seligman, Founding Father of Positive Psychology)

 

Ordinary Looking

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Right now, you are missing the vast majority of what is happening around you. You are missing the events unfolding in your body, in the distance, and right in front of you…

…I would find myself at once alarmed, delighted, and humbled at the limitations of my ordinary looking. My consolation is that this deficiency of mine is quite human. We see, but we do not see: we use our eyes, but our gaze is glancing, frivolously considering its object. We see the signs, but not their meanings. We are not blinded, but we have blinders…

…By marshaling your attention to these words, helpfully framed in a distinct border of white, you are ignoring an unthinkably large amount of information that continues to bombard all of your senses: the hum of the fluorescent lights, the ambient noise in a large room, the places your chair presses against your legs or back, your tongue touching the roof of your mouth, the tension you are holding in your shoulders or jaw, the map of the cool and warm places on your body, the constant hum of traffic or a distant lawn-mower, the blurred view of your own shoulders and torso in your peripheral vision, a chirp of a bug or whine of a kitchen appliance.

Alexandra Horowitz (On looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes)

Set Aside a Time for Worrying

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Your worries relate to real and practical problems in your life, so you cannot rid yourself of them altogether, but you can learn to control when you think about them. Fyodor Dostoyevsky famously commanded his brother not to think of a white bear, and we know from the experiment on thought suppression which followed that, given that instruction, you can think of nothing but a white bear. … Likewise, telling people not to think of their worries isn’t going to work…

Set aside 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes in the evening to do nothing but worry about the future. Sit at a table, make a list of all your problems and then think about them. But as soon as the time is up you must stop worrying, and whenever those worries come back into your head remind yourself that you can’t contemplate them again until your next worry time. You have given yourself permission to postpone your worrying until the time of your choice. Remarkably, it can work. It puts you in control.   

Time Warped: Unlocking the Mysteries of Time Perception by claudia Hammon

 

A Few Tricks To Help You Live The Present Moment

 

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A few tricks to help you live the present moment:

1: To improve your performance, stop thinking about it (unselfconsciousness).

2: To avoid worrying about the future, focus on the present ( savoring)

3: If you want a future with your significant other, inhabit the present (breathe).

4: To make the most of time, lose track of it (acceptance).

5: If something is bothering you, move toward it rather than away from it (acceptance).

6: Know that you don´t know (engagement)

Don´t Just Do Something, Sit There

breathe you are on line

. . . 

Algunos trucos para estar en el presente 1) Para mejorar tu rendimiento, deja de pensar en ello (se natural).  2)Para evitar preocuparte por el futuro, concéntrate en el presente (saborea). 3) Si quieres un futuro con tus seres queridos, habita en el presente (respira). 4) Para aprovechar el tiempo al máximo, piérdelo! (fluye). 5) Si algo te molesta acércate a ello en vez de escaparte (acepta). 6) Saber que no sabes (descubre). Deja de hacer cosas y tan solo relaja 

 

Time

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We construct the experience of time in our minds, so it follows that we are able to change the elements we find troubling – whether it’s trying to stop the years racing past, or speeding up time when we’re stuck in a queue, trying to live more in the present, or working out how long ago we last saw our old friends. Time can be a friend, but it can also be an enemy. The trick is to harness it, whether at home, at work, or even in social policy, and to work in line with our conception of time. Time perception matters because it is the experience of time that roots us in our mental reality. Time is not only at the heart of the way we organize life, but the way we experience it…

 

…we will never have total control over this extraordinary dimension. Time will warp and confuse and baffle and entertain however much we learn about its capacities. But the more we learn, the more we can shape it to our will and destiny. We can slow it down or speed it up. We can hold on to the past more securely and predict the future more accurately. Mental time-travel is one of the greatest gifts of the mind. It makes us human, and it makes us special.

Claudia Hammond

 

 

Stay Curious

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We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths. 

Vamos hacia delante, abriendo nuevas puertas y haciendo nuevas cosas porque somos curiosos y la curiosidad siempre nos conduce a nuevos caminos.

Walt Disney

 

Looks aren´t everything!

 

Why do we spend so  much time worrying about our appearance…

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…instead of looking below the surface?

 

 

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Nancy Etcoff : Survival of the Prettiest: The Science of Beauty

People judge appearances as though somewhere in their minds an ideal beauty of the human form exists, a form they would recognize if they saw it, though they do not expect they ever will. It exists in the imagination.

The human image has been subjected to all manner of manipulation in an attempt to create an ideal that does not seem to have a human incarnation. When Zeuxis painted Helen of Troy he gathered five of the most beautiful living women and represented features of each in the hope of capturing and depicting her beauty. There are no actual descriptions of Helen, nor of other legendary beauties such as Dante’s Beatrice.

In Brazil there are more Avon ladies than members of the army. In the United States more money is spent on beauty than on education or social services.

 

Cameron Russell: Looks aren’t everything. Believe me, I’m a model 

 

 

 

A Kinder, Gentler Philosophy of Success

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One of the interesting things about success is that we think we know what it means. A lot of the time our ideas about what it would mean to live successfully are not our own. They’re sucked in from other people. And we also suck in messages from everything from the television to advertising to marketing, etcetera. These are hugely powerful forces that define what we want and how we view ourselves. What I want to argue for is not that we should give up on our ideas of success, but that we should make sure that they are our own. We should focus in on our ideas and make sure that we own them, that we’re truly the authors of our own ambitions. Because it’s bad enough not getting what you want, but it’s even worse to have an idea of what it is you want and find out at the end of the journey that it isn’t, in fact, what you wanted all along.”

Alain de Botton   http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=MtSE4rglxbY#!

Waves Are Only Part of The Ocean

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Just as waves are only part of the ocean, perceptions, feelings, and thoughts are only part of the self…

…waves are a natural expression of oceans. It is useless to try to repress or stifle them. It is impossible. We can only observe them. Because they exist, we can find their source, which is exactly the same as our own.

Thich Nhat Hanh